Shiozuke Experiment #1

Shiozuke means, literally, salt pickle. This, the simplest of Japanese pickles, is a mainstay of the pickle platter. The process can be achieved with the most basic of kitchen items: salt, bowl, time. The length of time varies according to your needs, with the shortest amount of time not depending on any fermentation whatsoever. One can simply slice cucumbers, grate ginger, salt the two in a bowl, massage them and let them sit until the salt has osmosed the water right out. In this case, the pickles are squeezed out and the resulting vegetables are laid out for eating. This is too simple for my taste and without the added je-ne-sais-quoi of a fermented product.  Continue reading

Misozuke Cucumbers

Japan has, for millennia, excelled at the pursuit of umami. This most basic taste profile comes from a variety of sources, from meat to mushrooms to tomatoes to seaweed. It delivers the recipient to places that the other four tastes cannot even begin to imagine. A higher plane of sensory existence. The pursuit was one well worth engaging and it resulted in many good things both discovered and created: kombu seaweed, bonita tuna flakes, shiitake mushrooms, fish sauce, nutritional yeast, soy sauce and miso paste, among many others.

miso paste

MISO

Miso is itself a fermented product, the result of soybeans being overtaken by the filamentous fungus called koji or Aspergillus oryzae. So, it only seems natural that it should be used to ferment other edible items, imbuing those tertiary characters with the enviable umami profile. Of course, the Japanese have given us this gift as well. Called miso-zuke (literally miso pickle), the embedding of vegetables in a miso mixture is a common practice among traditional Japanese cooks. Continue reading